Author: Cesanne Rhend

Grand Central Terminal: A “Fun Palace” of Musicians Part-I

[vc_row enable_first_overlay="true" first_overlay_opacity="81" first_background_type="image" first_background_image="2447" first_background_image_size="" first_background_size="cover" css=".vc_custom_1507001113062{background-position: center !important;background-repeat: no-repeat !important;background-size: contain !important;}" el_id="DESKTOP AND LAPTOP"][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1507004085225{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;background-color: #ffffff !important;border-left-color: #d6d6d6 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #d6d6d6 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #d6d6d6 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #d6d6d6 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}" el_class="modal-column-a"][vc_row_inner el_class="close-botton-mobile-row" css=".vc_custom_1507001117820{border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-color: #efefef !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}" el_id="sticky-header"][vc_column_inner width="7/12" offset="vc_col-xs-2"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="social-buttons-column" width="1/3" offset="vc_col-xs-8"][vc_widget_sidebar sidebar_id="sidebar" el_class="social-buttons"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/12" offset="vc_col-xs-2"][mpc_icon transition="fade" url="url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rhends.com|||" icon="eti eti_close" icon_color="#888888" hover_icon="eti eti_close" hover_icon_color="#333333" class="close-botton"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_class="modal-row-a-bottom"][vc_column_inner el_class="article-sidetext-left-column" width="1/4" enable_sticky="true" sticky_offset="300" offset="vc_col-lg-2 vc_col-md-3 vc_col-xs-1 vc_hidden-xs"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#888888" class="article-subtitle"] <h4 style="text-align: left;">On The Side</h4> <h4 style="text-align: center;"></h4> [/mpc_textblock][vc_separator color="custom" align="align_left" accent_color="#ededed" el_class="article-separator-4"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#555555" margin_divider="true" class="article-sidetext-left"] <h6><em>I brought with me, from music to </em><em>architecture, a curiosity for time and </em><em>space and a fascination for how one </em><em>relates to another. I look for settings,</em><em>architectural and urban, within </em><em>which the acting forces of time and </em><em>space may allow for a renegotiation </em><em>within themselves. I am curious to </em><em>see how placing an alien entity into </em><em>or displacing a familiar entity within </em><em>an existing space-time frame can </em><em>provoke new events.</em></h6> <h6><em>I brought with me another curiosity </em><em>for whether and how new technology </em><em>can facilitate a spontaneous </em><em>renegotiation of those forces within a </em><em>setting through public participation.</em></h6> <h6><em>These curiosities contributed </em><em>to a number of projects who </em><em>attempt to renegotiate space, </em><em>place and time within particular </em><em>urban and architectural settings. </em><em>The renegotiations range from </em><em>elongation of time, therefore space, </em><em>in an abortion clinic to induce </em><em>Anesthesia, to an introduction of </em><em>a foreign program into an urban </em><em>context in an urban dairy farm, to </em><em>physical displacement of fragments </em><em>of an abandoned warehouse to a </em><em>new site.</em></h6> <h6><em>In Filling the Temporal Gaps </em><em>of Grand Central Terminal, a </em><em>project I briefly worked on in my </em><em>graduate studies, my curiosities </em><em>found a fertile ground for a fruitful </em><em>renegotiation of time/space/capital </em><em>dynamics through utilization of new </em><em>technology. And a promise for new </em><em>ways of advancing spatial justice </em><em>within urban settings.</em></h6> [/mpc_textblock][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="article-body-column" width="2/3" offset="vc_col-lg-7 vc_col-md-7 vc_col-xs-12"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" class="article-title"] <h1 style="text-align: left;">Grand Central Terminal: A “Fun Palace” of Musicians</h1> [/mpc_textblock][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" class="article-subtitle"] <h4 style="text-align: left;">Or: An Interstitial "Place Of Assembly", Part I</h4> <h4 style="text-align: center;"></h4> [/mpc_textblock][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#c90000" class="article-author"] <h3 style="text-align: left;">By Cesanne Rhend</h3> [/mpc_textblock][vc_separator color="custom" align="align_left" accent_color="#ededed" el_class="article-separator-1"][vc_single_image image="3336" img_size="medium" el_class="image-1"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" margin_divider="true" margin_css="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;" class="article-body"] <h5>Transportation hubs are intriguing settings in which individuals willingly abandon their desire for control over their personal space to gain mobility. In New York City Subway this offers a rare opportunity for active encounters between riders from across the entire income spectrum. This proposal identifies underutilized spaces and infrastructure in Grand Central Terminal and advances a solution for reclaiming them for new collective events, more particularly musical performances by subway musicians.</h5> <h5>The re-imagined terminal is a ‘place’ where encounters develop into participations and shape an ‘enduring assembly’ of ephemeral events. It employs cybernetics to enable an ongoing mediation of space-time-event dynamics through public participation in order to maintain its ‘relevance’ and ‘spontaneity’. This helps the terminal continuously recreate its ‘uniqueness’ and, correspondingly, regenerate ‘rent’ opportunities for its owners.</h5> <h5>While specific to a site and a program, the proposal seeks to provide a vehicle for a broader discourse on new ways of appropriating existing settings for new collective events in cities enabled through utilization of new technology.</h5> [/mpc_textblock][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" margin_divider="true" margin_css="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;" class="article-body"] <h2 style="text-align: left;">Setting</h2> <h5>In subway trains individuals’ prioritization of mobility over personal space finds a distinct social dimension; With stops along a wide range of neighborhoods, each subway line is a cross-section of the city’s demographics. Consequently, each train car shapes a potential place for encounters among riders from different socioeconomic backgrounds who temporarily expose themselves to others and to “otherness” and attain a “multi-sensory sensibility to random interaction”. (Lévy, 2012) This is specially the case in New York City Subway where riders’ average income can vary as much as 180,000 (from 20k to 200k) dollars in two consequent stops. ( New Yorker, 2015)</h5> [/mpc_textblock][vc_single_image image="2130" img_size="medium" el_class="image-2"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" margin_divider="true" margin_css="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;" class="article-body"] <h5>Grand Central Terminal in New York City is a particularly intriguing example of such encounters for a variety of reasons. It has the world’s largest number of platforms (44) and covers forty-eight acres of some of the most valuable land in the world. The station attracts 750,000 people each day to visit, shop, and travel. With 21.5 million annual visitors the terminal is the sixth most visited tourist attraction in the world.</h5> <h5>What makes Grand Central Terminal a suitable setting for what this proposal seeks to accomplish is not only the large numbers; Grand Central Terminal is the only privately owned train station in New York City. New York Subway System itself is an anomaly to transport environments in the U.S.; in a city that surpasses country averages of poverty rate and income inequality, “all income groups ride the transit system”. (Perrotta, 2015) These two anomalies firstly exemplify a transportation hub’s full potential as a place of encounters, and secondly present a rare opportunity for re-engaging with the capital that has traditionally shied away from investing in transportation—a hesitation rooted in fears of contributing to an “organic growth in social capital” (Harvey, 1989) that investing in means of transportations as ‘fixed capital’ necessitates.</h5> [/mpc_textblock][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" margin_divider="true" margin_css="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;" class="article-body"] <h2>Opportunity</h2> <h5>The spatial configuration a terminus train station like Grand Central Terminal is particularly intriguing: the collision of grand forces of money, space, and, capital finds an apparent and clear expression in terminal’s bottle-shaped anatomy. From an analytical standpoint, the spatial clarity facilitates a more concrete understanding of these shaping force and allows for a fruitful re-negotiation of their dynamics: in Grand Central Terminal a parallel arrangement of trains must transition into a serial arrangement before a train can depart. This inevitably generates temporal departure gaps which, on platforms, translates into an ever-changing number and configurations of train cars waiting their turn to depart.</h5> [/mpc_textblock][vc_single_image image="1758" img_size="medium" el_class="image-3" css=".vc_custom_1507148142853{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #ededed !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #ededed !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #ededed !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #ededed !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#0a0a0a" margin_divider="true" margin_css="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;" class="article-body"] <h5>In an extraordinary cycle, a spatial attribute (configuration of platforms in plan) generates temporal inefficiencies (schedule gaps) which in turn results in spatial opportunities (unused spaces in empty trains) of vastly different nature and scale, a cycle from large to small, from static to dynamic, and from permanent to ephemeral. Should these underutilized spaces be reclaimed, the terminal can accommodate events of equally different nature.</h5> [/mpc_textblock][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_3" font_color="#888888" margin_divider="true" margin_css="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;" class="article-body"] <h4 style="text-align: right;"><a href="https://www.rhends.com/displacement-as-instigator-of-events-part-II">continue to part II </a></h4> [/mpc_textblock][vc_text_separator title="Fall of 2016" color="custom" accent_color="#cccccc" el_class="article-separator-end"][mpc_textblock content_width="100" font_preset="preset_2" font_color="#0c0c0c" class="recent-posts-heading"] <h4 style="text-align: center;">SIMILAR ARTICLES</h4> [/mpc_textblock][vc_separator color="custom" align="align_left" accent_color="#ededed" el_class="article-separator-2"][mpc_grid_posts cols="3" gap="3" items_number="3" layout="style_9" title_overflow="true" title_font_preset="preset_2" title_font_color="#0a0a0a" hover_title_color="#c90000" meta_layout="author" meta_font_preset="preset_0" meta_font_color="#c90000" meta_link_color="#c90000" hover_meta_link_color="#c90000" meta_margin_divider="true" meta_margin_css="margin-top:0.3px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0.3px;margin-left:0px;" description_font_preset="preset_3" description_font_color="#0a0a0a" description_padding_divider="true" description_padding_css="padding-top:0.3em;padding-bottom:0.3em;" border_divider="true" border_css="border-top:0px;border-right:1px;border-bottom:0px;border-left:1px;border-color:#f4f4f4;border-style:solid;border-radius:0px;" padding_divider="true" padding_css="padding-top:0.5em;padding-right:1em;padding-bottom:0.5em;padding-left:1em;" mpc_button__disable="true" class="recent-posts-title"][vc_separator color="custom" align="align_left" accent_color="#ededed" el_class="article-separator-3"][mpc_button url="url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rhends.com|||" icon="el el-home" icon_color="#888888" icon_effect="stay-left" hover_icon_color="#c90000" class="home-link-bottom"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="recent-posts-column" width="1/4" offset="vc_hidden-md vc_hidden-sm vc_col-xs-1 vc_hidden-xs"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]
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